Fluoride in Water – Removing Fluoride From Drinking Water in Dallas, Austin, Plano TX Cities

As subscribed readers and regular visitors know, I’ve been doing a great deal of research into the fluoride controversy, especially the controversy surrounding water fluoridation and where the fluoride added to water supplies actually comes from. Public awareness about fluoride in municipal water supplies, fluoride in bottled water etc is rapidly growing. That’s a very good thing.

When I research a topic, I spend alot of time digging deep into the subject, sometimes to the point of obsession. I make no apologies for doing whatever I can to help bring greater awareness to the fluoride debate, and the sooner every average citizen like myself decides to spend some time learning about water fluoridation and where the fluoride comes from, the better.

Where does fluoride come from that is added to your drinking water supplies?

When was the last time you went to your local city website and pulled up the Water Quality Report and took a good long look at what that report shows? What water contaminants, naturally occurring or otherwise, does the water quality report show? What chemicals, various additives and potential health hazards does your local city water contain, and what is the city water department doing about it? If your source of water is mainly well water, how often do you have the water quality tested for contaminants?

Reading and researching water fluoridation, or fluoride in general, isn’t about fear-mongering or conspiracy theories, as is so often discussed. What does science, chemistry etc say about the fluoride added to drinking water supplies? Where does the fluoride come from? What is the fluoride compounds made of? What does your city Water Quality Report say about where the fluoride comes from that is added to your water that you use to drink, cook with, make your morning coffee with, shower or bathe in?

I don’t know about you, but I wanted to know where fluoride comes from that is added to city water supplies, particularly fluoride in water in local cities within Texas. I went to several Texas city websites to pull up and read the water quality report to see what, if anything, would be said about fluoride in water. The Texas city websites that I checked include Dallas, Plano, Richardson, Carrollton, Fort Worth, Addison, Rockwall, Garland, Rowlett, Allen and Frisco, to name a few. The results were quite revealing.

Professional Perspectives on Water Fluoridation Video

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Having done a tremendous amount of research into the water fluoridation debate, it is easy to understand why so many cities, towns and communities in the U.S., including Austin Texas, are strongly opposed to water fluoridation and are fighting hard for the removal of fluoride from drinking water in their local areas.

More than 250 cities in the U.S. alone have already banned fluoride from being added to their water, and more communities are getting into the fight to have fluoride removed from their water. Public awareness about the dangers of fluoride and water fluoridation is rapidly growing – have you begun researching the fluoride controversy yet?

Removing fluoride from drinking water supplies at local city levels is a tough fight for sure, especially considering how adamant fluoridation proponents, doctors and dental professionals are on the issue of water fluoridation. Removing fluoride from your own drinking water requires water filters that include fluoride filters, such as reverse osmosis water filters that come with special filters to remove the fluoride.

Water Quality Reports on Water Fluoridation in Texas Cities

  • The City of Dallas water quality report page includes information from 1998-2010 in English and Spanish. Describing where the fluoride comes from that is added to Dallas water supplies on the 2010 water report under the “inorganic contaminants”, it says: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories“. Make special note of the listing of Arsenic in water within Dallas’ public water supply, shown a few lines below the fluoride listing. [emphasis added]
  • The City of Fort Worth water quality report on fluoride added to water for the year 2010 under “inorganic contaminants” says the same thing: “Water additive that promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories”.
  • The water quality report for the City of Rockwall for the year 2010 describes where the fluoride comes from that is added to Rockwall’s water supply much the same way: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • Rowlett’s 2010 “Annual Drinking Water Quality Report”, listed under Inorganic Contaminants, explains where their fluoride comes from that is added to the City of Rowlett‘s water supplies this way: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • The City of Garland‘s water quality report for 2010 on fluoride added to water supplies for Garland residents, listed under Regulated Substances, explains where the fluoride comes from like this: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • The City of Allen TX 2010 water quality report isn’t any different than the previously listed cities, describing where the fluoride comes from that is added to drinking water supplies for Allen residents. Their report, listed under Inorganic Contaminants, says this: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • The City of Addison‘s 2010 water quality report, describing where the fluoride comes from that is added to their water supply, listed under Regulated Substances, says this: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • The City of Carrollton‘s water quality report for the year 2010, under the heading Inorganic Contaminants, explains where the fluoride comes from that is added to their water supply the same way: “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.”
  • The City of Frisco‘s water quality report for 2010, under the heading Inorganic Constituents, lists the “possible source” of fluoride in water as “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive.” What does water additive mean?
  • The City of Plano water quality report for 2010, under the heading Inorganic Constituents, also lists the fluoride source for Plano water supplies as “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive.” Again, what does water additive mean? Plano’s 2008 water quality report lists the source of fluoride in drinking water supplies as “Water Additive”. However, the 2009 water quality report for the City of Plano lists the source of fluoride in water “Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.” So THAT’s what “water additive” means.

Regardless of where you live, within the U.S. or Canada or elsewhere, take the time to do some research into WHY water fluoridation is so controversial. Why are so many people, private citizens, doctors, dentists, chemists, scientists etc so opposed to fluoride in water? The fluoride used to fluoridate water supplies is NOT the “naturally occurring” fluoride most have been lead to believe. It’s time for you to take a good hard look into the controversy about fluoride and water fluoridation. You’ll be amazed at the scientific and chemical evidence that supports ending water fluoridation, and you won’t look at your water supplies the same way ever again.

 

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One Response to “Fluoride in Water – Removing Fluoride From Drinking Water in Dallas, Austin, Plano TX Cities”

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  1. Jenny says:

    I can certainly understand the debate over adding flouride – I’m firmly against it – but then again, I take my childrens teeth and hygiene very seriously. Chlorine, I’m not willing to give up. We don’t want another Walkerton on our hands, but anything thats not there for the sole purpose of making safe, in my mind, should be removed.
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